My Interview in #DerFreitag March 23rd-On Our #Documentary, Native #Stereotypes & Eurocentric History

In Der Freitag’s print edition, on our upcoming documentary Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany, historical context and how the USA’s deliberate “alternative facts” or Eurocentric fabrication of history contributes to continuing racism, colonialism and oppression of Native Americans. Stereotypes are a symptom of the overall disease. Interview and article by Matthias Dell.

Our crowdfunding campaign is in its last days, please help us reach our goal and bring this important project to a wider audience, in its best possible form! At IndieGoGo.

My Interview on #Deutschlandradio Kultur Kompressor Radio Show-March 14, 2017

 

Here’s the direct link to listen online to my interview on Deutschlandradio’s Cultural Radioshow “Kompressor”, sharing news on Native current events and talking about the directing (and currently filming) “Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany”. At the webpage, interview in German is at the top. To listen in English, the link is at the end of the article. Our documentary is on Native stereotypes in Germany, racism and colonialism, of which the 19th century created but still popular pseudo “Indian” Winnetou is the ultimate symbol. Please visit our film website, follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, and help support our bringing it to the world. Our funding campaign is still live on IndieGoGo.

Trailer

“Forget Winnetou!” Help Us Reach our #Crowdfunding Goal

crowdfundeditThe crowdfunding campaign for our documentary film Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany is now live. Please drop by, read more about the story behind our film, our aims and who is involved. Check out our perks and consider donating but most of all, we just ask that you please help us out by sharing our message around in some way.

What’s unique about our documentary? To date, there is no other film or project like it in Germany that addresses the issue of stereotyping, and which includes a strong, wider perspective from Native Americans. We’ll present “healthier” more culturally respectful ways that decolonize minds and media, while giving Natives an opportunity to present themselves.

Crowdfunding campaign link https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/forget-winnetou–2/x/6473967.

Website https://forgetwinnetou.com/
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/forgetwinnetoufilm/
Twitter https://twitter.com/forgetwinnetou/
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/forgetwinnetou/
IMDb http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6494700/?ref_=nv_sr_1

NEW! Teaser for Our Documentary “Forget Winnetou!” Coming in 2017

NEW! From Flying With Red Haircrow Productions, the interview trailer for Forget Winnetou: Going beyond #NativeAmerican #Stereotypes in #Germany. Coming in 2017, it’s the fruition of years of work and experiences, from myself and colleague Timo Kiesel.

“Native stereotypes damage everyone, especially young people, especially in a country with a genocidal history. It teaches its okay to be culturally abusive to others and perpetuate misconceptions. Winnetou is the ultimate native stereotype.”

To learn more please visit our website. For regular updates and news on current events, please follow us on social media.

At Red Rising Magazine-“Professions-What do “Real Natives” Do?”

My latest think piece at Red Rising Magazine, featuring a photo of our graphic artist Natasha John, from our documentary Forget Winnetou!. Please visit RRM for the full article.
rr-art

The definitions of “real Indian” as opposed to “not authentic” Indian, based on ancestry or blood quantum level, or additionally on physical appearance, dress, behavior and attitude, can be compared to deciding what is a traditional or non-traditional profession as a means to judge dedication or connection to heritage and culture. This all being distinctly aside and separate from non-natives claiming to be natives, or those with distinctly questionable native heritage appropriating and then benefiting from being “Native” in non-native circles, mind you.

In whatever indigenous tribe, people or group, for the majority the reality and understanding maybe that there isn’t (or shouldn’t be) division between anything done, spoken, achieved or studied so as to be considered non-traditional or traditional. It is all connected. There is no compartmentalization of belief, activity or work. In everything you do, whether recognizable to others as “native”, it is Native because you as a Native did it, accomplished it, and added to it from who and what you are.”