15 June We’re at Humboldt University in Berlin- #RepresentationMatters: Decolonizing Indigeneity

Free event.


“Headdresses at carnival, childhood games, books sold by the millions for generations: iconic colonial racist imagery such as Karl May’s fictional character Winnetou keeps shaping our distorted images of indigenous North American cultures and histories. Together with author, film maker and psychological counselor Red Haircrow and with Timo Kiesel, film maker (“White Charity” 2011) and member of glokal e.V. we will discuss how representation of indigenous people and First Nations in the Americas and Germany are entangled with the material reality of social inequality and indigenous struggles for sovereignty, environmental justice and survival.The event is bilingual and located on ground level.”

SPEAKERS Red Haircrow and Timo Kiesel, producers of the forthcoming documentary film “Forget Winnetou“
DATE June 15th, 6.30 pm
LOCATION Department of Social Sciences, HU Berlin, Universitätsstraße 3B, 002/003
fb: https://www.facebook.com/events/825440424287819/
Contact: studikreis@riseup.net


DEUTSCH Version
#RepresentationMatters: Decolonizing Indigeneity. June 15th | 6.30pm | UNI3B R002/003

“Karnevalskostüme, Kindheitsspiele, Bücher in Millionenauflage seit Generationen: Kolonialrassistische Imaginationen mit Kultstatus wie jene rund um den fiktionalen Charakter Winnetou von Karl May prägen unser verzerrtes Bild indigener nordamerikanischer Kulturen und Geschichten. Gemeinsam mit dem Autor, Filmemacher und psychologischen Berater Red Haircrow und mit Timo Kiesel, Filmemacher („White Charity“ 2011) und Mitglied bei glokal e.V. wollen wir diskutieren, wie fremd- und selbstbestimmte Repräsentation von indigenous people und First Nations in Deutschland und den Amerikas mit der materiellen Realität sozialer Ungleichheit und mit indigenen Kämpfen um Souveränität, environmental justice und Überleben verwoben ist. Der Workshop ist zweisprachig. Der Ort ist barrierefrei erreichbar.”

SPEAKERS Red Haircrow and Timo Kiesel, producers of the forthcoming documentary film “Forget Winnetou“
DATE June 15th, 6.30 pm
LOCATION Department of Social Sciences, HU Berlin, Universitätsstraße 3B, 002/003
Contact: studikreis@riseup.net

Who Is The Enemy To This Land? #DefendTheSacred

This land does not belong to us. It is not ours. We don’t know the stories here. Our ignorant bliss offends and desecrates. We remain an enemy to all life. This is a hard understanding because it asks us to stop and consider how blindly we walk on stolen land that is not ours. We […]

via We Don’t Know the Stories Here — Awakening the Horse People

At Missy Magazine, “#CulturalAppropriation & Violence” #KulturelleAneignung und koloniale Gewalt

Kulturelle Aneignung und koloniale Gewalt at Missy Magazine, an article by Noa Ha, on which I was consulted for comments on examples in contemporary German society. The article is in German. Art © Moshtari Hilal.

“Über „Cultural Appropriation“ kann nicht debattiert werden, ohne über koloniale Kontinuitäten zu sprechen.”

 

“NGO’s, Accomplices & Why ‘Ally’ Is the Wrong Term” #IndigenousRising

Allies. Supporters. Friends. When all the aforementioned, by whatever description, bring additional issues too many don’t want to address, let alone admit. So what can be done, especially from an indigenous perspective? It is a critical time of critical need, of native revitalization and resurgence, when internal or external forces must not hold entire movements back. Ultimately, they will not, I believe, but I also feel, like so many others, these problems must be solved right now before they continue or allowed to grow further. Mistakes of the past must not be repeated. Allowances, excuses or generosity rewarded with treachery.

Originally posted on Warrior Publications: Conspiracy At Fort Michilimackinac, by Robert Griffing. by Zig Zag, Warrior Publications, December 22, 2016 Ally: to unite or form a connection or relation between… to form or enter into an alliance (two factions allying with each other). Merriam-Webster Dictionary There’s been some discussion over the last couple of years…

via On the Question of Allies — Unsettling America

The Historical & Modern Dangers of Non-Native Interpretation of #StandingRock & #Indigenous Movements

dsc_2560I’m currently finishing Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath by Barbara Alice Mann, which was published in 2016 by Oxford University Press. While it has many, many, many truths the majority of the non-native world, academicians, scholars, so-called experts and others have overlooked, ignored or missed, there is some which  some natives don’t or only minimally know, also. Not excluding myself from some of that reality either. Much of it I was aware of or had learned on some level, but some, not in depth at all.

Yet for this post in particular, and considering the situation at the camps at Standing Rock who remain determined in the face of what others might see as overwhelming odds, the challenges of interpretation of native motives has always been an issue since Europeans first invaded. Misinterpretation is the more apt word, but the interpretations and labels placed on natives and native behavior, beliefs or traditions, especially by self-termed allies or “friends” has been problematic, arguably even as much as outright mendacity. It can all serve the same purpose in the end.

“The dangers of native enthusiasm and interpretation in translation of native concepts by non-natives (sometimes with natives facilitating this) has led to some of the greatest massacres and aggressive response by the USA military. Wounded Knee was a response to interpretation and sensationalization by those who returned from a Ghost Dance (Wovoka, Paiute). While (textbook) history does say the US feared the Ghost Dance Movement, they only knew more about it as scholars interpreted it as a “Messianic” movement and military deployed to kill.”

Similarly, the dangers of fabrications, lies and sensationalization such as we’ve seen at Standing Rock, the fearmongering, rumors and gossips on both sides of the DAPL issue has been the cause of much unrest, trauma and turmoil, even if one side may consider themselves pro-Standing Rock. It can be seen to serve the same purpose of villification and reduction in the eyes of the “corrupted” law, especially as arrested and arraigned water protectors are now facing trials.

“The myth these scholars started was that Wovoka wished to replace Jesus with himself, which was nothing of the sort. And these things were written by enthusiasts/experts on “Indians”, even making themselves spokesmen, to detrimental, deadly effect even while they were making a name for themselves who, since they got the natives killed, had no or few to gainsay. “Friend” of the people. Why are natives so wary? This is why.”

Barbara Alice Mann goes on to debunk the origin of the Bering Strait theory using their own reasoning, the myth that natives were all fighting each other anyway, that they were sworn enemies, the reality of how missionary Christianity and Catholicism were the main components of native genocide and ethnocide, particularly deadly to sacred ones such as medicine people, women’s societies and two-spirits (using the modern intertribal term). Full review coming soon for NAIS, Native American Indigenous Studies Association.

I classify this an essential read for Native American/Indigenous Students students, natives and non-natives alike, but particularly for anyone who believes any of the myths about the original peoples of Turtle Island. Some of which they likely do not realize as such, and have accepted as fact. This book is classified widely as one pertaining to religion, but that’s again an interpretation of non-natives. Spirituality is inseparable from traditional native life, cultures and traditions. So this is about NATIVES, past and present. Simply that.

To learn much more about “U.S. Colonial Policies Impacting Indigenous Spirituality & Sacred Sites”, because yes, ethnocide & genocide of the original peoples of Turtle Island is still ongoing, please visit Indigenous Action Media.