The Challenges & Realities of Humboldt Forum in #Berlin #NoHumboldt21

Three years ago I wrote an article for Indian Country Today Media Network, which was titled “Naked Faux Savages and Neo-Racism in Berlin”, to which I posted a link here on my blog. A particular museum in Berlin has chosen to have a theater troupe perform a fake potlatch ceremony, in which naked performers sexualized their interpretation of such an indigenous gathering. The museum’s director Viola König continues to work for the Humboldt Forum project, and to me symbolizes all that is wrong with the project: the entire idea and still being built edifice to its colonial brutality hidden behind a “civilized” facade.

The challenge and reality is European museum directors, curators, supporters and others, including many of the European visitors have benefited from white privilege and supremacy for centuries, educated to believe this is civilized, conservative behavior to preserve what remains of certain cultures and peoples for posterity. This is the lie of the whole thing, and ignores the crimes against the survivors who have been petitioning and ignored though rightfully demanding their peoples objects be repatriated.

When anyone has been taught that culturally abuse, misinterpretation, misrepresentation and misattribution is normal, who have been taught to believe these things are civilized parts of their society, they keep perpetuating these crimes. Other challenges and realities is that there are persons who work for Humboldt forum and/or within the German (colonial) museum system who recognize and admit these are stolen items but who wish to keep their jobs.

On 15 October I will participate is a two-day event titled, “Prussian Colonial Heritage”, which discussions and challenges the continuing colonial practices and behaviors where Europeans justify and excuse the monumental crimes against other cultures, primarily those of people of color, and their refusal to return stolen objects, sacred items and even the remains of indigenous peoples and others. Protests against the project have continued before and since the foundation stone was laid in 2013, and the Humboldt Forum’s planned completion is 2019. Another protest is planned for 20 September, as members of various organizations such as Post-Kolonial Berlin, continue to work a forcible change in policy and protocols at HF and other museums.

From the 2014 article at ICTMN: “The Ethnological Museum continues to be the center of controversy regarding cultural insensitivity, misinformation and shock-value displays of indigenous items from around the world. One such was a display case of sacred Native items alongside a crushed Budweiser can and empty flask of whiskey, with a blurb stating that the biggest problem among Native Americans was alcoholism.

The museum’s director, Viola König, defended the sexualized performance and the museum’s collection. “Das Helmi were simply, playfully implementing all typical contemporary prejudices in a vivid, imaginative way to entertain,” she said. Regarding the controversial objects and displays in the museum, she said, “Organizers of the Humboldt Lab said, ‘Cultural appropriation is always a violent act, and direct or structural violence were likely used in acquiring many objects of our ethnological collections, but they still need to be shown.’”

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12 &15 October: A Workshop on Native Issues Then A Conference on “Stolen Sacred Objects & Human Remains”

And if you don’t know the backstory on this: here’s a briefer. The Humboldt Forum is a German state funded multimillion-dollar recreation of a Prussian emperor’s palace. Began in 2013, scheduled for finish in 2019, it will house the multiple thousands of looted and stolen indigenous and other cultural objects from around the world, including human remains.
There has been an on-going protest against the project, especially as reparations for colonial genocide are being met with resistance and apathy by many Germans, and like the “new” airport (did they ever finish it?) has been troubled with internal and external problems. There are those who work with or in association with the Humboldt Forum who agree items were stolen and should be returned, that continue to internally advocate for change. This conference gives voice to encourage they and others to be more demonstrative in their advocacy.

French art historian Bénédicte Savoy recently quit the project, to the great consternation of the Forum, because of the continued ignoring of unethical procurement Humboldt has the opportunity to correct, but thus far does not. Even in the consultation work on the items and remains, indigenous persons, peoples and tribes are ignored in favor of Eurocentric German opinion.

I’ll be speaking on and sharing information about stolen sacred items, objects and human remains on 15 October at this conference. Learn more about the event and other details at the Facebook page.


 

On 12 Oct. I’ll be giving a workshop at the Brebit event “Fachtag ‘Entwicklungshilfe’ oder Reparationen?” Themes of rethinking Columbus Day, indigenous activism, and contemporary issues. Find more details at their event page

 

15 June We’re at Humboldt University in Berlin- #RepresentationMatters: Decolonizing Indigeneity

Free event.


“Headdresses at carnival, childhood games, books sold by the millions for generations: iconic colonial racist imagery such as Karl May’s fictional character Winnetou keeps shaping our distorted images of indigenous North American cultures and histories. Together with author, film maker and psychological counselor Red Haircrow and with Timo Kiesel, film maker (“White Charity” 2011) and member of glokal e.V. we will discuss how representation of indigenous people and First Nations in the Americas and Germany are entangled with the material reality of social inequality and indigenous struggles for sovereignty, environmental justice and survival.The event is bilingual and located on ground level.”

SPEAKERS Red Haircrow and Timo Kiesel, producers of the forthcoming documentary film “Forget Winnetou“
DATE June 15th, 6.30 pm
LOCATION Department of Social Sciences, HU Berlin, Universitätsstraße 3B, 002/003
fb: https://www.facebook.com/events/825440424287819/
Contact: studikreis@riseup.net


DEUTSCH Version
#RepresentationMatters: Decolonizing Indigeneity. June 15th | 6.30pm | UNI3B R002/003

“Karnevalskostüme, Kindheitsspiele, Bücher in Millionenauflage seit Generationen: Kolonialrassistische Imaginationen mit Kultstatus wie jene rund um den fiktionalen Charakter Winnetou von Karl May prägen unser verzerrtes Bild indigener nordamerikanischer Kulturen und Geschichten. Gemeinsam mit dem Autor, Filmemacher und psychologischen Berater Red Haircrow und mit Timo Kiesel, Filmemacher („White Charity“ 2011) und Mitglied bei glokal e.V. wollen wir diskutieren, wie fremd- und selbstbestimmte Repräsentation von indigenous people und First Nations in Deutschland und den Amerikas mit der materiellen Realität sozialer Ungleichheit und mit indigenen Kämpfen um Souveränität, environmental justice und Überleben verwoben ist. Der Workshop ist zweisprachig. Der Ort ist barrierefrei erreichbar.”

SPEAKERS Red Haircrow and Timo Kiesel, producers of the forthcoming documentary film “Forget Winnetou“
DATE June 15th, 6.30 pm
LOCATION Department of Social Sciences, HU Berlin, Universitätsstraße 3B, 002/003
Contact: studikreis@riseup.net

Who Is The Enemy To This Land? #DefendTheSacred

This land does not belong to us. It is not ours. We don’t know the stories here. Our ignorant bliss offends and desecrates. We remain an enemy to all life. This is a hard understanding because it asks us to stop and consider how blindly we walk on stolen land that is not ours. We […]

via We Don’t Know the Stories Here — Awakening the Horse People

At Missy Magazine, “#CulturalAppropriation & Violence” #KulturelleAneignung und koloniale Gewalt

Kulturelle Aneignung und koloniale Gewalt at Missy Magazine, an article by Noa Ha, on which I was consulted for comments on examples in contemporary German society. The article is in German. Art © Moshtari Hilal.

“Über „Cultural Appropriation“ kann nicht debattiert werden, ohne über koloniale Kontinuitäten zu sprechen.”