15 June We’re at Humboldt University in Berlin- #RepresentationMatters: Decolonizing Indigeneity

Free event.


“Headdresses at carnival, childhood games, books sold by the millions for generations: iconic colonial racist imagery such as Karl May’s fictional character Winnetou keeps shaping our distorted images of indigenous North American cultures and histories. Together with author, film maker and psychological counselor Red Haircrow and with Timo Kiesel, film maker (“White Charity” 2011) and member of glokal e.V. we will discuss how representation of indigenous people and First Nations in the Americas and Germany are entangled with the material reality of social inequality and indigenous struggles for sovereignty, environmental justice and survival.The event is bilingual and located on ground level.”

SPEAKERS Red Haircrow and Timo Kiesel, producers of the forthcoming documentary film “Forget Winnetou“
DATE June 15th, 6.30 pm
LOCATION Department of Social Sciences, HU Berlin, Universitätsstraße 3B, 002/003
fb: https://www.facebook.com/events/825440424287819/
Contact: studikreis@riseup.net


DEUTSCH Version
#RepresentationMatters: Decolonizing Indigeneity. June 15th | 6.30pm | UNI3B R002/003

“Karnevalskostüme, Kindheitsspiele, Bücher in Millionenauflage seit Generationen: Kolonialrassistische Imaginationen mit Kultstatus wie jene rund um den fiktionalen Charakter Winnetou von Karl May prägen unser verzerrtes Bild indigener nordamerikanischer Kulturen und Geschichten. Gemeinsam mit dem Autor, Filmemacher und psychologischen Berater Red Haircrow und mit Timo Kiesel, Filmemacher („White Charity“ 2011) und Mitglied bei glokal e.V. wollen wir diskutieren, wie fremd- und selbstbestimmte Repräsentation von indigenous people und First Nations in Deutschland und den Amerikas mit der materiellen Realität sozialer Ungleichheit und mit indigenen Kämpfen um Souveränität, environmental justice und Überleben verwoben ist. Der Workshop ist zweisprachig. Der Ort ist barrierefrei erreichbar.”

SPEAKERS Red Haircrow and Timo Kiesel, producers of the forthcoming documentary film “Forget Winnetou“
DATE June 15th, 6.30 pm
LOCATION Department of Social Sciences, HU Berlin, Universitätsstraße 3B, 002/003
Contact: studikreis@riseup.net

Who Is The Enemy To This Land? #DefendTheSacred

This land does not belong to us. It is not ours. We don’t know the stories here. Our ignorant bliss offends and desecrates. We remain an enemy to all life. This is a hard understanding because it asks us to stop and consider how blindly we walk on stolen land that is not ours. We […]

via We Don’t Know the Stories Here — Awakening the Horse People

#Documentary News On “Forget Winnetou!”-Welcoming Johnnie on Board!

yvpnznsxWe’re pleased to have Johnnie Jae as an interviewee! Speaking on Native stereotypes and the effects on all concerned, sure, but mostly on what Natives are doing now. What’s going on? How do Natives respond to continued misrepresentation? Why is decolonization so important?

“Johnnie Jae is of the Otoe-Missouria and Choctaw tribes of Oklahoma, the founder of A Tribe Called Geek, managing partner of Native Max Magazine , and contributor to Native News Online. She is the manager and producer for the Success Native Style Radio Network. She is also a founding board member of Not Your Mascots and Live Indigenous OK.”
Description and her podcast interview from/on NextGen Natives.


Please visit our film links for Forget Winnetou! for more information on our upcoming film on Native stereotypes, cult characters and their connection to colonialism and racism. #DecolonizeNow!

At Missy Magazine, “#CulturalAppropriation & Violence” #KulturelleAneignung und koloniale Gewalt

Kulturelle Aneignung und koloniale Gewalt at Missy Magazine, an article by Noa Ha, on which I was consulted for comments on examples in contemporary German society. The article is in German. Art © Moshtari Hilal.

“Über „Cultural Appropriation“ kann nicht debattiert werden, ohne über koloniale Kontinuitäten zu sprechen.”

 

Decolonization of Indigenous Studies: A Voice From Both Sides of the Desk

megRead my full article at Red Rising Magazine!

“From my perspective, indigenous studies is about creating allyship between natives and non-natives, but for everyone to be close to ‘being in the same place’ and have a conversation about current indigenous issues, we had to go back to basics. That meant a lot of breaking down of their epistemologies, breaking down prejudices and stereotypes of misinformation that were present. Histories, literature, watched movies, music lyrics, theories, what questions shouldn’t you ask and which ones you most definitely should when learning about natives. Unlearning fabricated Europeanized history in order to receive actual indigenous history.”

“Two of the most significant things that stuck with non-native students was having actual boarding or residential school survivors come into class and share their stories, the other was looking at the romanticized stereotypes of their childhoods then learning how destructive that is for native peoples. Whenever they would write down what they had learned, that’s what they pointed out.

But all during these times, as there were only one or two native students per class, natives were usually quiet because they felt it wasn’t their space anymore. It wasn’t about the indigenous, it was about what white people were missing and their opinions, viewpoints and needs that they wished validated. So, misinformation wasn’t the only thing holding the classes back, but the power dynamics, attitudes and behaviors white students had developed due to privilege.”

“The thing is, when they bring their white fragility, seeking indigenous methodologies, trying to circumvent white privilege, that’s not what Native Studies is about. If you want to play white colonialism,” said Singer, “you need to go do that someplace else. I mean, people are dying on reservations but you’re here talking about yourself.”