Filming for #Winnetou-My Interview with Drew Hayden Taylor: Ojibwe Playwright, Author & Filmmaker’s Documentary

Ojibwe playwriter, author & filmmaker Drew Hayden Taylor is visiting Germany again, filming for his upcoming documentary on the continuing Winnetou phenomenon, stereotyping…and playing of “Native” by Germans and other Europeans. I was interviewed for a segment in the eventual production, on why I’m in Germany and also making a film, but mine is more on why it’s time to Forget Winnetou, due to the German societal issues of racism, neo-colonialism and stereotyping directly contributing to strife and intercultural turmoil. Afterwards, we walked to a local café and had casual conversation and coffee with the crew.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Drew’s bio: Taylor is a prolific author and playwright with over 27 published books and numerous writing awards to his credit. He was born and raised on the Curve Lake First Nation in Ontario Canada and still lives there. Learn more about his current trip here.

 

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New Trailer for #Documentary “Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany” (2017)

The new trailer for “Forget Winnetou!” is here. Deutsch version here. This is the longer, explanatory trailer, but we will do a short teaser (50-59s), too. Thank you to all the participants and constructive feedback, and we look forward to sharing the finished documentary with everyone in December!

Intro: “What does a world look like that respects indigenous peoples, that’s working to end racism, colonialism and intersecting oppression on a global scale? A part of that is stopping stereotyping, and Native stereotypes are some of the most pervasive and recognized, but most don’t know their origins or the real harm they do.”

Coming December 2017, “Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany”. Directed & Produced by Red Haircrow, Associate Producer Timo Kiesel. Learn more at https://forgetwinnetou.com/ and http://forgetwinnetou.de/.

 Video Editing:
Red Haircrow

 Video Footage:
Red Haircrow
Timo Kiesel
Mark Williams
Viveka Frost

 Still Photographs:
Jen Osborne
Bernd Sauer-Diete
Viveka Frost
Red Haircrow
Timo Kiesel

 Main Participants:
Kendall Old Elk and family
Stefka Ammon
Johnny Clyde
Johnnie Jae

Music:
“Deep Haze” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)-Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

Flying With Red Haircrow Productions

 

Another Pop-Up Cinema in #Berlin, #Free Screening & Discussion of “Reel Injun” (2010) on 27 July

I’ll be speaking at the Pop-up Cinema screening of “Reel Injun” on 27 July, with Berlinale NATIVe in association with Humboldt Forum. The event takes place at MACHmit! Kinder Museum at Senefelder 5/6 in Prenzlauer Berg, 10437, Berlin. Please follow BerlinaleNAtive to learn of upcoming events, as several more are planned through the end of summer, with films from around the world.

Topic: “What kind of image do Native Americans have in Westerns, what do the cowboy-and-Indian myths mean for North America, and how did this genre shape the way cinema developed? In the German-speaking world, Karl May’s Wild West fantasies and Pierre Brice, the “French Winnetou”, still influence people’s notions and images of Native Americans in North America. In this second part of its programme, the Pop-Up Cinema invites you to watch two very different films, both of which question the familiar clichés of prairie romanticism.2
DANCE TO MISS CHIEF
D: Kent Monkman, 2010, 5 min, music video
REEL INJUN
D: Neil Diamond, Catherine Bainbridge, Jeremiah Hayes, Canada 2010, 88 min, English with German subtitles
ADMISSION
free
———
“Was ist das Bild der amerikanischen Ureinwohner in Westernfilmen, was bedeuten Cowboy- und Indianermythen für Amerika und wie hat all das die Entwicklung des Kinos beeinflusst? Karl Mays Wildwest-Wunschträume und der „französische Winnetou“ Pierre Brice prägen unsere Vorstellungen und Bilder von Native Americans in Nordamerika bis heute. Das Pop-up Cinema lädt in seinem zweiten Filmblock zu zwei sehr unterschiedlichen Filmen, die beide jedes bekannte Klischee von Prärieromantik hinterfragen.
DANCE TO MISS CHIEF
R: Kent Monkman, 2010, 5 Min, Musikvideo
REEL INJUN
R: Neil Diamond, Catherine Bainbridge, Jeremiah Hayes, Kanada 2010, 88 Min, Englisch mit deutschen Untertiteln
EINTRITT
frei

“Forget Winnetou!” Trailer Selected for Avanca Film Festival Screening

Pleased to announce our Forget Winnetou- A Documentary Film trailer has been selected for screening at Avanca Film Festival, 26-30 July 2017!

To view our first official trailer, you can do so here.

“What does a world that respects Indigenous peoples look like, that’s working towards ending racism, colonialism, and other intersecting oppression on a global scale?” -Andrea Marcos

Most films about Native Americans focus exclusively on Native experience in North America, however stereotypes of the original peoples of Turtle Island have spread around the world even as more Natives are living or working abroad. And Germany has one of the most notorious and beloved, sometimes fiercely defended symbol named “Winnetou”, a stereotypical American Indian created by German author Karl May in the late 19th century.

Decades later, despite its inherent racism and colonial nature, the heavily Eurocentrized fictional native and his pseudo Apache tribe are still recreated in films spreading misinformation to new generations, reinforcing white privileged and supremacist systems and attitudes. Although surely not the intention, it is still culturally abusive practice that deliberately ignore Natives and others who object, and minimizes and/or dismisses multiple research studies on the harm of such behaviors to everyone in society. This must end.

“Just because it’s fiction, doesn’t mean it’s harmless.”

“Reeducating the resistant.”

 Recent promotional interviews:

Presenting on June 2nd in Saarbrücken at the “Indigenous Pop Culture” Conference

On June 2nd, I’ll give a presentation at the “Indigenous Popular Culture Conference” at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany. The conference is titled; “A Long Time Ago on a Reservation Far, Far Away: Contemporary Indigenous Popular Culture across the Globe.”

MY ABSTRACT: “While many people express growing boredom with Hollywood and other western film studios producing sub-standard, unoriginal movies or rebooting television series or films of the past, the Native indie film industry is booming. Despite the low ebb of unique productions to which even Hollywood admits, scripts by people of color, including Natives, continue to be rejected and ignored primarily because they don’t fit the stereotypical material usually churned out about them by others.

Thus, more Native filmmakers today than ever before are writing, filming and sharing their own work, by Natives for everyone, representing and presenting themselves and their stories, whether fiction or non-fiction. More Native artists and filmmakers are collaborating and coming together in events, such as the Indigenous Comic-Con whose inaugural celebration took place in November 2016, to encourage and promote each other. It is also open to the public, and all are welcome.

Discussion will include why films about Natives made by Natives so important; what the issues and benefits are both for Native individuals, nations and communities, and non-Natives; and the intersectionality of native films with social justice, activism and sovereignty. Material will include visual examples of contemporary native films, filmmakers, production companies and organizations, such as A Tribe Called Geek that report on, encourage and promote contemporary artists and filmmakers.”

More details about the event, here.