Aug 24- Q&A for Pop-up Cinema Screening “Hunt for the Wilderpeople” at Bi’bek in #Berlin

 

Aug.24-I’ll be part of a Pop-Up Cinema #10 Q&A with audiences, along with Jason Ryle from imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. Event in association with Berlinale NATIVe and Humboldt Forum. Free admission to see this terrific drama-comedy “Hunt for the Wilderpeople” directed by Taika Waititi.

Synopsis: “The rebellious Ricky is growing up without parents and the child welfare agency places him in a foster home in a remote part of New Zealand with the pragmatic Auntie Bella and her grumpy husband Hec. Ricky feels at home there for the first time ever – but then Auntie Bella dies and Ricky is supposed to go and live with a new foster family. Instead he flees into the bush and has an incredible adventure with Hec, closely pursued by a police manhunt.”

In the third part of its programme, the Pop-Up Cinema is screening the 2016 film Hunt for the Wilderpeople, an adventure comedy by Maori director Taika Waititi (whose other film credits include What We Do in the Shadows).

Hunt for the Wilderpeople
D: Taika Waititi
New Zealand 2016, 101 min
English with German subtitles
Free admission

Deutsch

“Der rebellische Ricky wächst ohne Eltern auf wird und vom Sozialamt im „neuseeländischen Nirgendwo“ bei der pragmatischen Auntie Bella und deren griesgrämigen Ehemann Hec untergebracht. Hier fühlt sich Ricky erstmals in seinem Leben wie zuhause, doch dann stirbt Auntie Bella und Ricky soll einer neuen Pflegefamilie zugewiesen werden. Er flieht in den Busch, und gemeinsam mit Hec erlebt er ein unfassbares Abenteuer, während die Polizei mit einem Großaufgebot nach ihnen sucht.”

Das Pop-Up Cinema von Humboldt Forum und Berlinale NATIVe zeigt in seinem dritten Block die neuseeländische Abenteuer-Filmkomödie Hunt for the Wilderpeople des maorischen Regisseurs Taika Waititi (u.a. 5 Zimmer Küche Sarg) aus dem Jahr 2016.

Hunt for the Wilderpeople
R: Taika Waititi
Neuseeland 2016, 101 Min
Englisch mit deutschen Untertiteln
Eintritt frei

Film Review: “In Football We Trust” (2015)- Samoans in the NFL

Screening now at the Pacifica Film Festival and many others around the world, a documentary we reviewed last year that shares the stories of Pacific Islanders making their way into the NFL…and at what cost.

Red Haircrow Review

IFWTIndieLensBanner

(Photo from their Official site please follow the link to read more.)
Country: USA | American Samoa
Release Date: 23 January 2015
Filming Locations: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, America Samoa

Directors: Tony Vainuku, Erika Cohn

Description: “In Football We Trust” captures a snapshot in time amid the rise of the Pacific Islander presence in the NFL. Presenting a new take on the American immigrant story, this feature length documentary transports viewers deep inside the tightly-knit Polynesian community in Salt Lake City, Utah. With unprecedented access and shot over a four-year time period, the film intimately portrays four young Polynesian men striving to overcome gang violence and near poverty through American football. Viewed as the “salvation” for their families, these young players reveal the culture clash they experience as they transform out of their adolescence and into the high stakes world of collegiate recruiting and rigors of societal…

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Tell A Yarn

K.I.N. Knowledge in Indigenous Networks

Yarn

Photo credit: Noritta Morseu-Diop

The word yarn or yarning has taken on a whole new meaning since returning from Australia this week.

I’ve spent the last few weeks surrounded by story-tellers telling a yarn. I’ve listened to men stand and speak in their native tongue of Te Reo Māori to address New Zealand Government. I’ve experienced extraordinary, strong and daring women stand-up and bear their souls to a room full of strangers through yarning. And travelled across the Tasman to Brisbane, Australia to be with First Nations elders, leaders and youth to share my yarn on “Building movements, not empires”.

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Native Perspectives- #Film #Review: “Matariki” (2010)

matariki 1copyTagline: “In the darkest night the stars still shine.” 

Director: Michael Bennett

Writers: Iaheto Ah Hi (story), Michael Bennett (story)

Review:

At times a little disjointed, “Matariki” is the story of how lives can coincide just through one senseless act then overlap and metamorphosize into a new network of connections.

Everyone has their struggles, their strengths and weaknesses in this “slice of life” drama, and we see a common thread of wanting and needing love, of belonging, of being accepted for who and what they are. Sometimes it works out, at other times it doesn’t, but more often they just don’t really know what to do and things just happen. They keep trying, however.

Each of the actors believably portrayed their characters: a gay couple wanting to be accepted by their families, a young couple with a baby imminently due that neither wanted in the first place, a mentally challenged man whose dog is his greatest friend, and a couple of teenagers just wanting to get away from the rules and misunderstanding with their parents. The central focus is the act of violence that has left a Maori former sport star in serious condition. Never having felt accepted by his family, his Anglo wife remains at his bedside faced with a heartbreaking decision that she feels she should not make alone. Continue reading

#Native Perspectives- #Film #Review: “The Last Saint” (2014)

last

Tagline: “Sometimes doing right means doing wrong.”

Special Notes: Debut feature film from the director.

Director/Writer: Rene Naufahu
Stars: Beulah Koale, Calvin Tuteao, Joseph Naufahu
Production Companies: Imaginex Studios, The Reservoir

Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Release Date: August 28, 2014

Plot: “Minka is a teenage Polynesian boy living in the heart of the city. With his P-addicted mother well on the way to going completely off the rails, three people enter his life – each with a promise – each with the power to destroy.”

Review:

“Minka lives in a home where his mother obviously loves him, but who suffers from emotional and mental disorders due to domestic violence and intergenerational trauma. She has long attempted to self-medicate through substance abuse, triggering episodes where she terrorized and abused her son leaving him traumatized as well. Like many children in such homes, however, he is deeply devoted to her, serving as a keeper, a parent, his own childhood lost through having to take care of both her and himself, a lonely existence.

When his long absent father Joe returns offering him work, his mother having used all their funds on drugs, Minka accepts, not knowing what it really involves. Soon, the reality of the ‘requirements’ hits hard, leaving Minka between the proverbial ‘rock and a hard place’. While he might gain a sense of belonging through the gang and attempts at ‘normalizing the family, the ‘live skills’ Joe attempts to teach him and the casual, terrible violence and aggression often involved makes him question where will it all end. When tragedy occurs, Minka finds the answer for himself.

Continue reading